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    Getting started - Building your first Game

    This is a very quick guide to using Crafty.

    For a more thorough but somewhat out-dated guide, check out Darren Torpey's tutorial. (As of 0.6.3, in addition to the changes Darren mentions at the end, you'll need to change the signature of Crafty.load)

    Setup

    First let's setup our HTML file. We're trying to get you up and running quickly, so we'll just directly link to the latest release version. (Of course you can also install it locally!)

    <html>
      <head></head>
      <body>
        <div id="game"></div>
        <script type="text/javascript" src="https://rawgithub.com/craftyjs/Crafty/release/dist/crafty-min.js"></script>
        <script>
          Crafty.init(500,350, document.getElementById('game'));
        </script>
      </body>
    </html>

    A Crafty.js game is build up of entities -- the player character, enemies, and obstacles are all represented this way.

    Lets start by creating a simple colored square:

    Crafty.e('2D, DOM, Color').attr({x: 0, y: 0, w: 100, h: 100}).color('#F00');

    There are a few things going on here:

    • We first call Crafty.e with a list of components to add to the entity. Components provide basic building blocks of functionality. In this case, we add 2D, DOM, and Color. You can learn more about those later!
    • We then call two methods of our newly created entity: attr() and color(). The attr method is one of many that all entities share, but color() is (unsuprisingly) provided by the "Color" component. Most methods you call on an entity will return the entity itself, allowing method chaining as in the above example.

    The full code would look something like this now:

    <html>
      <head></head>
      <body>
        <div id="game"></div>
        <script type="text/javascript" src="https://rawgithub.com/craftyjs/Crafty/release/dist/crafty-min.js"></script>
        <script>
          Crafty.init(500,350, document.getElementById('game'));
          Crafty.e('2D, DOM, Color').attr({x: 0, y: 0, w: 100, h: 100}).color('#F00');
        </script>
      </body>
    </html>

    And when executed:

    Now that we got something to show up on the screen, lets try making it move by using the keyboard arrows.

    That can be done with the "Fourway" component. This component is well suited for games with a top-down perspective and enables us to move in four directions (as the name suggests).

    Crafty.e('2D, DOM, Color, Fourway')
      .attr({x: 0, y: 0, w: 100, h: 100})
      .color('#F00')
      .fourway(200);

    Notice how we added the name of this component to the string after Color. This adds new methods like the ".fourway" function. The number which is passed to the function determines the speed, so if the number is higher it will move even faster.

    Lets try to make it look like a platform game, where the entity is impacted by gravity. That can be done with the "Gravity" component.

    But if we added the Gravity component now, the entity would just fall because there is nothing to stop it from falling. So lets add a long, thin green box which will provide a surface to fall upon:

    Crafty.e('Floor, 2D, Canvas, Color')
      .attr({x: 0, y: 250, w: 250, h: 10})
      .color('green');

    Notice how we added a new component called "Floor" to this entity. You won't find this component in the api docs, and it doesn't add any new methods. It's a name we just made up, and it serves to tag this entity.

    The Gravity component should only be added to entities which should be falling, so we do not need to add it to our new entity.

    Now we'll add the Gravity component to our previous red box:

    Crafty.e('2D, Canvas, Color, Twoway, Gravity')
      .attr({x: 0, y: 0, w: 50, h: 50})
      .color('#F00')
      .twoway(200)
      .gravity('Floor');

    You should notice that the ".gravity()" function has been called with the argument "Floor". That means that all entites which have the Floor component prevent the entity from falling further.

    Additionally, we replaced the Fourway component with the "Twoway" component. This component is well suited for side-scrolling platformers and enables us to move in two directions (as the name suggests). It also allows us to jump in combination with the Gravity component. Notice that we replaced the "fourway" function with the "twoway" function, which is similarly used to specify the movement speed.

    Well, that's not really a very good game, but its a start! To learn more about how to use Crafty, you can explore both our overview of common topics, and detailed api documentation.

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